Pedestrian Safety

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In 2011, on average, a pedestrian was killed every two hours and injured every eight minutes in traffic crashes. The Department of Transportation (DOT) has recently announced a plan to reduce pedestrian injuries and fatalities across America. The DOT, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) are all working together on the “Everyone is a Pedestrian” campaign to raise awareness and increase safety for pedestrians across the country.

Just the Facts

  • In 2011, 4,432 pedestrians were killed in traffic crashes.
  • An estimated 69,000 pedestrians were injured in crashes in 2011.
  • Three out of four pedestrian deaths happen in urban areas.
  • 70 percent of those deaths happened at non-intersections.
  • 70 percent of deaths also happened at night.
  • In 2011, pedestrian fatalities accounted for 14 percent of all traffic crash deaths.

In addition to public safety campaigns, a variety of grants have been offered to various communities to increase pedestrian safety. The State of Florida is even participating in this campaign with their Pedestrian Safety Action Plan which will include workshop presentations and other resources for pedestrians and drivers. The NHTSA offers a variety of tips for increasing safety for pedestrians.

NHTSA Safety Recommendations for Drivers

  • Lookout for pedestrians, everywhere, all of the time.
  • When visibility is reduced due to night time conditions or poor weather, be especially watchful for pedestrians.
  • Never pass vehicles that are stopped at crosswalks.
  • Slow down at intersections and expect to stop for pedestrians at crosswalk areas.
  • Don’t be a distracted driver!
  • Don’t drive under the influence of drugs or alcohol.
  • Always follow speed limits, and be extra vigilant in school zones and neighborhood areas.

Since drivers aren’t always looking out for pedestrians, it’s critical for pedestrians to take measures to protect themselves. Listed below are a few great tips to help pedestrians stay safe.

NHTSA Safety Recommendations for Pedestrians

  • When possible, walk on a sidewalk or designated path.
  • If no sidewalk or path is available, walk facing traffic to allow for greater awareness of traffic.
  • Stay alert at all times. Don’t be a distracted walker, and put away the smart phone.
  • Be Predictable.
  • Use crosswalks when available.
  • Don’t walk on freeways or other pedestrian-prohibited areas.
  • Be visible! Wear bright or reflective clothing.

Ultimately, drivers need to be on the lookout for pedestrians. Pedestrians who survive collisions with motor vehicles are often facing extensive medical bills, lost wages and long-term pain and suffering. If you or a pedestrian you love has been hit by a car, contact the experienced personal injury attorneys at Weldon & Rothman, PL at (239) 262-2141.

Legal Disclaimer: The above guidelines are educational in nature and do not create an attorney/client relationship. It is highly recommended that all Florida accident victims contact an experienced local Florida personal injury attorney to assist them with specific facts and circumstances regarding their motor vehicle accident. If you have been the victim of a motor vehicle accident in Florida, then feel free to contact Attorney Weldon toll free at (877) 730-5180 or via e-mail atinfo@weldonrothman.com

Richard L. Weldon, II is an experienced Florida personal injury attorney who has obtained the AV Preeminent Rating by Martindale-Hubbell. He is the managing attorney of Weldon & Rothman, PL – a Southwest Florida law firm with offices in Naples, Fort Myers, and Sarasota.

 

 

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1 Response to Pedestrian Safety

  1. Pingback: Step Up Pedestrian Safety | Pedestrian Crossings

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